Item #684 [World War One][Kaiser Wilhelm II] Autograph Letter Signed--Elbert Hubbard to Charles N. Doughty March 1915. Elbert Hubbard.
[World War One][Kaiser Wilhelm II] Autograph Letter Signed--Elbert Hubbard to Charles N. Doughty March 1915

[World War One][Kaiser Wilhelm II] Autograph Letter Signed--Elbert Hubbard to Charles N. Doughty March 1915

[World War One][Kaiser Wilhelm II] Autograph Letter Signed--Elbert Hubbard to Charles N. Doughty March 1915

Single-page typed letter signed on yellow watermarked paper measuring 8.5 x 11 inches. Watermark, in upper left corner is image of Elbert Hubbard--on Elbert Hubbard letterhead from East Aurora, New York. Previous folds and light chipping to left edge. Very Good Condition.

Elbert Hubbard (1856-1915), is best remembered as the long-time publisher of the Roycroft Press of East Aurora, New York and the formation of the arts and crafts community know as Roycroft. Roycroft was founded in 1895 by Hubbard and was a community of artists, printers, furniture makers, metalsmiths, leathersmiths, and bookbinders.

Hubbard was a prolific writer, using his own press to publish his many works, often in multiple editions utilizing the bookbinding skills of the Roycroft Community.

We find only one reference to Charles N. Doughty as that of a real estate agent practicing in the San Diego area.

This short, typed letter is enigmatic in its meanings, written 8 months after World War One began and just several months before Hubbard and his wife would perish in the sinking of the Lusitania. "I am glad you agree with me on the Menace proposition. What sort of a world would it be, indeed, if that measly orthodox preacher was running the world?" Given the time frame, we might assume "The Menace" is Kaiser Wilhelm of Germany and the "measly orthodox preacher" to be President Wilson.

There was a well-known WW I propaganda poster showing a stern-faced Kaiser simply titled, "The Menace". 6 months earlier in Hubbard's publication "The Philistine" Hubbard writes about 'Kaiser Bill' as "A maniacal night-watchman--drunk on power--who thinks he owns the factory."

The "measly orthodox preacher" might be less obvious but Woodrow Wilson was the son of a preacher and many felt Wilson had the demeanor of a man of the cloth.

The letter ends with, "The difference between the Menace man and us, however, is that we are only occasionally dam fools, while he is a dam fool all the time." See scans for full text and hopefully I can show the watermark which disappears unless back-lit. Item #684

Price: $250.00